Take a Hike - Point and Shoot


Take a camera hiking
There are many great ways to enjoy Wisconsin's State Parks, Forests, and Recreation areas. Walking along a trail is one of them. In fact, hiking and photography goes hand in hand. Take your camera and go for a slow walk. Any point and shoot camera will do. While walking down the trail, make a point to stop frequently. Find something to photograph within 10 or 15 feet from where you are standing. Continue along the trail. Stop and shoot. Stop and shoot.
One of the many advantages of digital photography is that you can see the results of your shots immediately on the camera’s display. Shoot lots and lots of photographs. Then, study the results carefully, and analyze what worked and what didn’t. It costs nothing to fill up a memory card, only to keep maybe 3 or 4 shots, erase the card and try again. With today's lightweight equipment there is little reason not to bring along some way to capture that once in a lifetime memory.

Get an early start. Most outdoor subjects look better when photographed in soft light. The bright midday sun creates glare and harsh shadows.

Composition is the way the content of a photograph is framed, or organized. A few suggestions on composition may be helpful. The first one is simply to visualize the way you want your photo to look before you take the shot. Think about whatever it is that has drawn your attention and the best way to place it in the photo, so that it also draws the viewers’ attention. This conscious visualization process, which only takes a few seconds, can make a big difference.
Rule of thirds
Don't center the primary object of attention. If the primary object of attention is in the center of the photo, many viewers’ eyes tend to lock onto it and not move through the “flow” of the photo. Along with its placement, the direction that the primary object is facing should be towards the “far” side of the photo, so that it has more “room” and does not give viewers’ the feeling it is “trapped” in the frame.
Whenever possible, photograph wildlife at eye level. Most people are accustomed to either looking up or looking down at wildlife. Eye level provides a different perspective. It’s more interesting to see things from the animal’s view of the world. It conveys something special to the viewer if you can make eye contact with your subject at its level.
Take a walk in Wisconsin's many recreational areas. Enter that perfect photograph in the Friends of Wisconsin State Parks Photocontest. Winners will be featured in the 2013 Friends of Wisconsin State Parks calendar, released in October 2012. Your entries must fit into a season- spring – summer-fall or winter and that they represent a feature of one of Wisconsin’s beautiful state parks, forests, trails or recreation areas. The 13 winners will be invited to the FWSP Annual Awards Banquet. The Friends of Wisconsin State Parks(FWSP) ask that your entries fit into a season- spring – summer-fall or winter and that they represent a feature of one of Wisconsin’s beautiful state parks, forests, trails or recreation areas.